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Discussion Starter #1
Just did first track day and when braking from high speed I felt a shudder in the front end and had hard time pulling up from 230k's.
Is this my pads as I have put front nissin's of zx14 on my zx10...
 

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All show and all go 10r
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your suspension isn't setup 100% the problem. how many miles on the bike and when was the last time you changed your fork oil? I had the same problem with my 6r and the fork oil was shit black. I had it rebuilt with ohlins internals and everything and it's just mint now. I can brake as hard as I want as long as I stay away from oil. Damn you turn 1.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks

bike only 5k on the clock and I thought I set it right, I got stock settings a but a few clicks on it as Im heaver than the stock settings so I gave it 2 clicks hardes all round??? I have Bitubo fork cartridges and rear shock on the way :thumbsup: should have been hear by now :dontknow:...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
no

I dont know how to I looked when I got home looked like I was close i could see where the rubber missed the bottom of the fork by 2 mm:sad:
 

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suspension as JLG suggested, it's not brake pads or calipers. front chatter is sometimes hard to dial out. you can get chatter from too little front rebound damping, which shows up as a slight pogo in sequential bumps that can build up into serious chatter if your damping is too light. if you add rebound damping it helps...up to a point, and then you can run into issues with off camber corners (fork rebounds too slow to maintain contact with the road). it will depend on the track you are running...experiment with rebound and compression in bumpy corners with hard braking.

mileage doesnt matter on fork oil condition; age and the type of miles is the issue, track time for instance tears up oil. fork oil should ideally be refreshed every year. new oil makes a huge difference! I would start with a clean slate with fresh oil.

as far as fork travel...2mm from the bottom of the stanchion is way too close. wrap a cable tie snug around the fork leg and monitor the max travel with hard braking. you can try adding compression damping in the front to keep the front from diving under track conditions (like say 4 clicks out), but if that's not enough to stop bottoming you may need to add front preload...redo your sag and set a bit harder (less sag) front and back. good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
well well looks like I no nothing about suspension

:thumbsup:All good info there guys looks like my new suspension will fix the problems im having and when I have it fitted get the sag set right..

This bring one thing to my attention Y don't bike shops ask to set this for every new customer the comes for a service and make sure it is set for that person????
 

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Cause they don't get paid for it, aren't suspension guys and generally people don't give a shit about one another. Remember go to any dealership look at a liter bike the sales guy will come up to you and say add a exhaust and tune it'll make 200hp no matter if it's a twin or 4 banger lol. I've had that happen to me looking at a rc8, 1198s, r1, etc....
 

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The local shop here in town set my bike up for me for $20 dollars. Went with 30/30 sag, as its only street riding with this bike.
 

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Here is some good advice from the OTT suspension guru Dave Moss, copied and pasted from another forum (south bay riders):

"You should have a zip tie on one of the fork legs. For the street you should get 2/3rds of total travel indicated by the zip tie. At that point you can soften or stiffen compression damping to suit the riding you are doing based on road conditions/speed etc.

Rebound needs to be set based on spring tension/SAG so your comments initially suggest that rebound may be the culprit. However, it could be spring tension in that fork is travelling too far in the stroke and coming back off the spring over sharp edged bumps,

Setting rebound is difficult, as it all depends how much leverage you can generate to work the forks correctly, and it is based on oil viscosity on the upstroke, so it depends how old the fork oil is.

Dave Moss"
 
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