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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

i have Gen 4 (track use only) and i raised the rear about 8MM by adding washers...i was looking at attack link but wondering if this would help my issue which is going wide coming out of corners...let's consider suspension is set up ok and rider skills ok (Apex, turning etc..)

it goes wide so much that i can't finish my corner and i have to let throttle go and come back in...

Is gonna help this issue? will i need to add the link on the top of the already raised rear or remove the washers and add rear link???

Any help greatly appreciated. Thanks,
 

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It has a much more progressive profile (maybe even a bit too far). The rear will not squat like it does now - which makes you go wide. In fact your spring rate may have to be reduced. Typical Attack things to consider now: No notes or installation info. No bearings included! Yes, you read that right, for that price they make you press out the needle bearings and put them into their part (or buy your own set to press in).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It has a much more progressive profile (maybe even a bit too far). The rear will not squat like it does now - which makes you go wide. In fact your spring rate may have to be reduced. Typical Attack things to consider now: No notes or installation info. No bearings included! Yes, you read that right, for that price they make you press out the needle bearings and put them into their part (or buy your own set to press in).
Geez WTL lol.. No bearing sucks..that's pain.. Any other link that comes with bearing? Thx for the info by the way
 

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If you get the Attack version don't expect it to be shiny gold like in their web pic either.
 

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One of the important considerations when choosing a link is can your suspension tuner setup your shock for that link. They work differently from one another, and the way I understand certain ones have certain trade-offs which you may or may not be ok with. The links are not just plug-n-play, you'll need to re-spring and likely re-valve your shock.

I use Thermosman, and he recommended the Lee Cycle (Jeremy Toye) link for me and was able to setup my JRI shock for it through the mail. It came with bearings. http://www.leescycle.com/parts/lees-cycle-products/

Dan Kyle also seems to have good reviews and is able to setup Ohlins shocks for his link, so he's another good option.

With either option, you'll probably have to remove your shims.

If you don't have an aftermarket shock yet, I would save up for that before a link.

What the link will help with is exiting the corner. As you open up the thorttle hard, leaving a corner, it will not want to just drive out to the outside of the track right away.

For mid-corner, it's going to be more suspension setup, ride heights and spring-rates, and of course, skill. The links will change your ride height and rate of compression, so it might cure some mid-corner issues if you are too soft (usual Gen 4 issue).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
One of the important considerations when choosing a link is can your suspension tuner setup your shock for that link. They work differently from one another, and the way I understand certain ones have certain trade-offs which you may or may not be ok with. The links are not just plug-n-play, you'll need to re-spring and likely re-valve your shock.

I use Thermosman, and he recommended the Lee Cycle (Jeremy Toye) link for me and was able to setup my JRI shock for it through the mail. It came with bearings. http://www.leescycle.com/parts/lees-cycle-products/

Dan Kyle also seems to have good reviews and is able to setup Ohlins shocks for his link, so he's another good option.

With either option, you'll probably have to remove your shims.

If you don't have an aftermarket shock yet, I would save up for that before a link.

What the link will help with is exiting the corner. As you open up the thorttle hard, leaving a corner, it will not want to just drive out to the outside of the track right away.

For mid-corner, it's going to be more suspension setup, ride heights and spring-rates, and of course, skill. The links will change your ride height and rate of compression, so it might cure some mid-corner issues if you are too soft (usual Gen 4 issue).
i have penske shock and i had issue with corner exit going wide..that's why i am getting the link..i appreciate the great info. We shall see next year :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It has a much more progressive profile (maybe even a bit too far). The rear will not squat like it does now - which makes you go wide. In fact your spring rate may have to be reduced. Typical Attack things to consider now: No notes or installation info. No bearings included! Yes, you read that right, for that price they make you press out the needle bearings and put them into their part (or buy your own set to press in).
i got lucky with used attack link with bearing in it lol..
 

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One of the important considerations when choosing a link is can your suspension tuner setup your shock for that link. They work differently from one another, and the way I understand certain ones have certain trade-offs which you may or may not be ok with. The links are not just plug-n-play, you'll need to re-spring and likely re-valve your shock.

Dan Kyle also seems to have good reviews and is able to setup Ohlins shocks for his link, so he's another good option.

Not only do we know the matching valving spec for the Ohlins shock based on weight range and type of riding, but we offer 2 different Linear Links for different rider weights as well plus we also know the baseline geometry set-up for the bike with the Ohlins + Link. We take the guesswork out of the equation for fitting a linear race link.
 

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Very happy with the Kyle link I'm running. Like LDH said, two versions to accommodate different rider weights. And it comes with new bearings already pressed in place.

The best part is the support. As kman0066 pointed out, it isn't just plug and play. They re-valved my shock to suit the new link, and worked with me to find the proper spring. The initial spring was a little too stiff for me, and they swapped it out for a softer spring - no charge.

It drives off the corners very nicely, and tire wear is much better than it would be with the stock geometry.
 

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I've built multiple ZX10's with the Attack link. I prefer it, as some have posted, learning the ins and outs of the link is the key really. I've worked with multiple shocks as well; Ohlins, JRI, KTech and Penske.

The other links will work as well. Just consult your tuner/builder. I'd go with whichever link they prefer to work with.
 

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I ordered the attack link because that's what suspension tuner likes to work with and what they've recommended with the TTX GP
 

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What spec are they revalving the TTX-GP shock too when used in conjunction with the Attack Link?
 

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No revalving. I asked Attack and they said none of their sponsored riders have had their shocks revalved to work with the link. My suspension tuner also said no to revalve as well.
 

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Well I can assure you, the Attack link requires the use of a larger spring than the OEM link. That larger spring requires more valving to control. Not to mention the characteristics of the link in general require a different valve curve to help the chassis play to the strengths of that link. Will it "work" without revalving? Yes, but you're leaving some performance on the table.
 

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SCRCJohn can you post/pm with specifics on this revalving you assure is necessary? Because as I wrote, I asked Attack and my suspension guy and all said not to valve. After spending a BIG pretty dime on this suspension upgrade, it would suck ass to know I'm robbed out of the full potential of this setup because of not revalving
 

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Well I can assure you, the Attack link requires the use of a larger spring than the OEM link. That larger spring requires more valving to control. Not to mention the characteristics of the link in general require a different valve curve to help the chassis play to the strengths of that link. Will it "work" without revalving? Yes, but you're leaving some performance on the table.
I'm more than inclined to agree with you, but I have zero hands-on experience with the Attack link which is why I was fishing for specs. The general confusion on the requirements of what the Attack link needs for set-up has been an on going issue with quite a few people and customers I have discussed this with so I am definitely looking to expand my knowledge and get some more feedback on it so I can accurately compare and contrast what I use and sell with it. I know the reason they have to use a stiffer spring with the Attack link is because that link does not alter the start rate which I feel is one of the most critical points.

On our Kyle Link which was designed by Cornwell we actually go to a lighter Ohlins spring for any given weight over the originally spec'd spring rates and revalving the shock is mandatory to match. We add a lot more damping and it makes a HUGE difference in the way the shock behaves and the tire wear. Seat time has been short this last season, but so far I keep getting quicker each time I go out and ride with more confidence and less drama. The back end feels good and while I still get leary of twisting the throttle and unleashing the beast on corner exit the bike has never given me any reason for concern.

I'm traveling tomorrow so I will have a hard time getting online, but I hope this thread continues on this course. Always looking for more info and data.
 
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