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I have been getting pretty geeky lately and was talking to somebody about computers, PC vs Mac, Windows vs OS 10 (or whatever Macs run), and some other random computer topics. He swears by Linux and claims it were possible to run it on his work computer he wouldn't even mess with windows.

I have been doing a little research on it and it looks cool as hell, but defintely doesn't look like something a rookie would jump right into. Questions:

-Does anybody run it?

-What is the upside?

-What is the downside?

-Should I take a class or buy a book before getting into it?

=There seem to be a shit ton of different programs to run with it (or on it); anyones that are a must have or ones to stay away from? Thanks....:thumbsup:
 

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When you talk to Linux guys they tend to be a little more geeky than the rest of us and swear by it to the point where they have a sincere hate towards Bill Gates. The problem is they tend to be more knowledgeable to make things work compared to the normal computer guru. It's something you have to be committed to and spend the time and research. It's not windows where there's plug and play everywhere, but I believe it's a great OS but what you loose depends on what you do on the computer or want to accomplish. I'll let the others with more experience with Linux based systems answer those questions but be prepared to learn if you go that route.:wink:
 

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I run a dual boot system on my main machine and run Linspire(one of the many versions of Linux) however it is still very limited as not many people write marketable software for it, it takes a while to load but once it has it is blindingly fast.
 

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FAF is spot on. Linux (or any flavor of Unix) is very reliable and very stable. Problem is it hasnt really gone main stream because of devolpment for things that the average joe likes. Games and what not. I used to run Red hat about 8 years ago on a 98 dual boot machine. I've since moved on, not much has changed though. To give you idea at just how stable linux is. M$ changed to "kernal" based OS (Win XP) because they saw how stable linux is..Linux uses and has always used a Kernal Based system
 

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mozilla firefox is linux based....thats why its better'n IE7.

You can get linux to boot and run from a burned cd, all for free. I'd try that first....get the hang of it, then install it to your hard drive if you like it.
 

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get a boot-CD version such as mandriva or knoppix that way you dont have to install it. just boot from CD.

This is a great way to learn - no books - just play around on it!
 

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Lots of people run Linux. It is great for servers and workstations.

The upside is that its open-source meaning it doesn't cost anything to run it. There are many different flavors of linux. "Linux" is actually the name of the underlying kernel. Companies such as RedHat, Ubuntu, Debian, etc all just package that with other utilities and programs to create their distribution.

The downside is that Linux is inherently a complex operating system and is command-line based. You can get programs such as X to run on-top of it to create a GUI similar to how Windows is. For a server you don't need a GUI which means less overhead, memory usage, cpu usage, etc.

It probably wouldn't hurt to buy a book on Linux commands. As far as recommendations on what to run, I would second the opinion of the above poster and try Knoppix (which runs from CD and doesn't write anything to your HDD) or Ubuntu if you wish to install a copy. Keep in mind if you run from a CD, it is not going to be anywhere near as fast as if it were running from the HDD.

Once you get familiar with one of those systems, you should try out Fedora, Genoo, Debian or another more hands-on version to really understand how it all "works".



lunitk said:
I have been getting pretty geeky lately and was talking to somebody about computers, PC vs Mac, Windows vs OS 10 (or whatever Macs run), and some other random computer topics. He swears by Linux and claims it were possible to run it on his work computer he wouldn't even mess with windows.

I have been doing a little research on it and it looks cool as hell, but defintely doesn't look like something a rookie would jump right into. Questions:

-Does anybody run it?

-What is the upside?

-What is the downside?

-Should I take a class or buy a book before getting into it?

=There seem to be a shit ton of different programs to run with it (or on it); anyones that are a must have or ones to stay away from? Thanks....:thumbsup:
 

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Been thinking about changing from XP to some Linux flavor. So tired of the problems I've been eXPeriencing. :lol:
 

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I run Linux desktops for all of my staff, a linux based mail server, linux database server and an trixbox phone system (linux based phone pabx). But these are all office systems. I run open office by solaris instead of msoffice and after a little whining everybody likes it.

I use it for a couple of reasons - I save $1000 in software per user, I can secure important files from both internal and external risks, virus protection is easier.

At home - All my machines run windows except for one which runs Myth TV and is a dedicated TiVO system sitting under my TV.

Pros: Ultra secure, infinately customisable, possibly the best office environment system available.

Cons: Can't play my games.....

As for knowing how to use it sit down and fiddle with it. Ideally have a reasonable system you can dedicate to it and just bash away. If you know how to use windows command prompt based commands ie cd, dir, copy etc learning the linux equivilents are pretty straight forward. ls instead of dir, cp instead of copy, nano instead of edit...
 

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I'm about to load Linspire on my home computer as part of the upgrade I'm doing. It's the most like windows and it uses a program called "wine" to run windows programs. Not sure of the overall compatibility though. Another freebie option is ubuntu. I'm gonna give that a go as well and see what I like the most. I only run office apps and internet from home though, no graphics, gaming, or anything like that so my needs are pretty low. The only downside I see is if you've got a lot of legacy windows programs that you can't live without - like CD/DVD editing software, hacked drivers, etc.
 

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wine works as long as the application isn't too resource hungry. You sure as hell wouldn't want to run a recent game through it.

For any kind of non-game application any one of the linux distro's is great. You will probably find that there is a free version of all of your legacy windows programs floating about as well. Especially editing / hacking apps. They seem to be everywhere.
 
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