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09 ZX10R Anniversary Edition
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I know the suspension out of the box is a weaker point on the Gen3 ZX10R. Are the adjustments something I can do in my garage? Im a bigger dude, it would help to get the front and rear setup for my size and the riding I do. Thanks. Spirited street riding and (soon) track use
 

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In short, yes.

In a long form, you can, and should set up preload and damping for you. But there is only so much you can do with setup, if there is an issue with your components. My rear shock for example was shot. I could make it work somewhat with different damping, but getting a service was the only real fix. So before we turn the dials, make sure that:

1. Your components are in good condition, and up to service.
2. You have the correct bike geometry.

If you have an issue with service or bike geometry, you can alleviate the issue a bit, but you can never fix it. If you are servicing/getting fork and spring serviced, make sure to check the springrates. Having the right spring for your weight is the third-most important thing. But afaik the standard springs work well enough for most riders on the street.

If you change your setup, always write down the numbers. You should always be able to go back to an old setting.

Now, the most important setting is the preload. Changing preload also affects the bike geometry, so take your time in setting this up.

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These make sure that the bike runs neutral, and the forks&shock have enough travel to smooth out bumps and potholes.

For the rest damping, you can watch
dave moss do the suspension setup for his bike. He knows his shit, and talks you through the process.
 

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G3 forks and shocks are fully adjustables. In short, yes, but they are not tuned in the range suitable for track use, nor are they balanced between the front and rear. It is very obvious the forks are stiffer and rear shocks is under-sprung and under-damped. In my experience, the full soft front, is firmer than the full stiff setting on the rear. That's just how bad they are.

Make sure the forks and shocks are serviced. For shocks, definitely need to be sprung and valved correctly. Stock shocks was no where near the performance compared to the forks. To me, tuning the stock shock is cheaper way to learn, before moving to brand names. Some would argue that spending money on aftermarket shocks makes more economical sense. It's your call.

Set the bike geometry correctly. You need someone with experience and know how. This bike is front heavy. General consensus points to dropping the triple clamp (raising the forks tubes) by a few (3~5) milimeters, and raise the rear by a few (3~5~8) mm. You can raise the rear by shimming washers at the top mount. You can study the rake and trail of various other bikes to understand this part. The Gen3 is 'slow', so doing this improves the agility, and in some sense swingarm angle, too. Minor adjustment is needed, if you switch tyre models or to suit your riding technique.

As you ride, pay attention to how the bike behaves - Hard braking, turning, line correction, throttle and brake application during turn etc.. Note the handling issues or observations, and we can see how to remedy it. Here is a read: https://lifeatlean.com/teach-me-suspension-rebound-damping-adjustments/

Once the bike and suspension setup gives you enough confidence, so that you can throttle harder with the bike leaned, you can learn to read tyre wear. Here is a read: Sportbike Suspension Tuning - Track Tire Wear Guide
 

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If you weigh more than 70kg, you're better off putting heavier springs and revalving the suspension. My wife was 67kg and bottomed out the stock forks on the track. We fitted K-Tech pistons in the forks and revalved them and the shock and she stopped bottoming out the forks and dropped 2 seconds a lap. The stock spring rates were good for her weight, but will be way undersprung for a bigger guy. Drop the front a bit to get the bike to turn in better and set the suspension right and they handle well.
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