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*****I got this off the SVrider forum and thought it was important. Maybe it should be stickied.*****

Hope this never happens.
But when it does, we need to be ready for others.
Found this from another forum.
Thought somebody could get one or two out of.

Accident Scene Management

As motorcycle riders we are all aware of the inherant dangers and risks that we take when we mount our bikes and head out to enjoy a good ride. Yes, it is that part of our shared passion that many of us don?t want to think about. However, these dangers and risks become all too apparent when we are faced with situations when a fellow rider is involved in an accident. Whether you are riding alone or in a group and you find yourself in a situation where a rider has gone down, ask yourself honestly, do you know what to do? Well, I asked myself this very question recently and realized that no, I do not. Aside from being able to contact 911 or flag down someone who could, I realized beyond that there is little I know how to do to assist a fallen rider. So, I have gathered some information that helped point me in the right direction and felt it was information that could help a lot of people who may not know what to do if such a situation were to arise.

I would like to share some tips on how to avoid being a part of an accident and what to do should you happening upon one.

DO NOT BECOME A PART OF THE ACCIDENT:

If an accident does happen, DO NOT STOP!!!! , continue to ride past until everyone has gone through. Do not target fixate and add to the scene. This is very important for everyone to accomplish if there is one.

This basically applies to group rides when there is a train of riders behind you. Suddenly stopping to assist in an accident can cause riders behind you that are unaware of the accident to slam on there brakes or swerve to avoid you and possibly add to the accident.

If you are riding alone be aware of your surroundings and the traffic around you before pulling off to assist. You do not want get hit from behind becuase you slowed too quickly and the car behind you did not have time to react.

REMAIN CALM... THINK!

The first thing you need to do when arriving on an accident scene is to stop, take two deep breaths to help you remain calm.
The idea of psychological management is that all the other people who are pumped and want to help will do whatever they are told to do by a calm person who seems to be in control and knows what he or she is doing. If you're excited and out of control as well, everyone will run around wasting precious time in an unorganized fashion.

1) Get to victim, reassure, establish communication.

After a person has gone down, they will be in a confused and scared state. They probably don't know what happened when they went down. They may be confused, frantic, etc., and often the only thing on their mind will be their bike. It is important to reassure them and to make sure they will not try to move or get to their bike. Something on the order of, "You've been in a motorcycle accident. It is important that you do not try to move. My name is (whatever your name is). "Tell them the ambulance is coming (assuming someone has been sent to get one or has called for one!) If your name is something like "Chainsaw'' or "Mega-death'', tell them your name is John or Bob or Mike.

Be careful what you say around the victim, even if they are unconscious. Hearing works in the unconscious state and if you say something like, "Boy, is this dude messed up bad! Maybe we shouldn't call an ambulance after all!'', it's going to register at some level with the person and can do nothing but harm. How you say things will be as important as what you say; keep (or at least sound) calm and it will reduce the panic of everyone else present.

2) Safety factors

An accident scene can be a hectic place with a lot of things going on at once. It is important to keep safety in mind; if you are helping someone lying in the middle of the road and a semi comes barrelling down on both of you, you aren't going to do that person much good.

a. Traffic
If people are available, get someone uproad and downroad to wave down traffic. This is especially important in tight twisties where they may not have time to stop after seeing the accident site.

b. Hazardous material spills (gas, oil, brake fluid)
People and vehicles will slip on this stuff. If ambulance personnel slip on oil while carrying the victim, it is bad. Either clean it off the road or indicate to everyone where it is.

c. Power lines
If power lines are down around or near the victim, ambulance crews may not be able to get near the person until they are shut off. It is important to call the local utility company to get these live wires turned off at the same time an ambulance is called. If the ambulance arrives and they are still live, they will have to call the utility company and wait for them to come out, wasting a lot of precious time in the Golden Hour.

d. Fire
People who smoke tend to light up under stress. Ask these people to either extinguish their smokes or move away from the flamable materials and/or bikes. It is easy to forget something obvious like this in a stressful situation like an accident scene.

e. Safety circle
Establish a few people around the immediate accident scene to help direct traffic, to point out fluid spills, and to warn people who may want to light up

3) Best-trained individual (medically-wise) attends to victim (U-ABCC)

The person with the most training (first aid, CPR, etc.) attends directly to the victim. Assuming the victim is lying on the ground, this person should sit behind their head and should stabilize his or her head to avoid unnecessary movement (i.e. hold their head still). Assume the person has a back/neck injury and any unnecessary movement could risk paralysis.

This person should be doing "U-ABCC'' at the arrival on the scene and every 5 minutes thereafter

U Urgency
Try to determine if the person's injuries are (a) minor or (b) major, i.e. urgent. If unsure, it is urgent. See (6) on trying to diagnose injuries.

A Airway
Is there something to impede their airway? Gravel in the helmet, something down the throat? This needs to be cleared immediately, without helmet removal if at all possible.

B Breathing
Is the person breathing? Determined by listening, watching their chest, feeling for breath, etc.

C Circulation
Check the pulse on the throat initially and subsequently on their wrist. This is the carotid artery, right next to the wind pipe/adam's apple on either side. If pulse is not present, remove helmet if necessary and begin CPR immediately. When checking pulse on their wrist, do not check with thumb; use the two fingers next to the thumb.

C Cervical Spine Immobilization
Support the victim's head and make sure they don't move it. CONSIDER EVERY MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT A HEAD INJURY, CONSIDER EVERY MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENT A CERVICAL/BACK INJURY! This is important even if they feel they can move their head normally! When you talk to the victim initially, add on a short bit to reassure them;

"You've been in a motorcycle accident. It is important that you don't move. My name is (whatever your name is). Answer me without moving your head. We don't know if you have a neck injury or not. An ambulance is on the way.''

Again, make sure that the victim does not move at all, their head or any other part.
 

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ICE - sticky?

Hey Boys!

Did a search on the forum for cellphone ICE, couldnt find anything, so here it goes...

After the latest bombs in London, UK, some smart ambulance drivers had problems finding out who to call on the victims cellphones. so they came up with ICE - In Case of Emergency.

The idea is that you program your cell with the name ICE and for example wife afterwords and then your wifes number with international prefix...

ICE WIFE +1 212 555 1212
ICE2 MOTHER ...
ICE3 BROTHER ...


So that everyone knows who to call if they find you 200 yards away from the road in an open field...


sounds like good idea? (its been spreading like a wild fire in europe...)

feel free to edit for spellning, I'm swedish and tired...:thumbsup:


/Thomas.
 

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:welcome:
 

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on the lighter side dont take ice and you wont have an accident
 

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Good post. Everyone should read this.

Me and another rider have already recently helped a downed rider in the middle of no where (reefton spur for those from Victoria). He was lucky and just broke/fractured his wrist, but was still pretty shaken up. After that we were talking about how we would have no idea what to do if we came across him and he was unconscious or had an even worse injury. I've now purchased a small medical kit (bandages etc) to carry around with me. Even if you fracture your wrist and bandage it up pretty well the person might be able to ride if there is no other way of getting contact.
 

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daem0n said:
Good post. Everyone should read this.

Me and another rider have already recently helped a downed rider in the middle of no where (reefton spur for those from Victoria). He was lucky and just broke/fractured his wrist, but was still pretty shaken up. After that we were talking about how we would have no idea what to do if we came across him and he was unconscious or had an even worse injury. I've now purchased a small medical kit (bandages etc) to carry around with me. Even if you fracture your wrist and bandage it up pretty well the person might be able to ride if there is no other way of getting contact.
Ahhh. Great riding out that way. Good idea the med kit
 

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It is recommended in American Heart that a typical lay person not assess for pulse in the guide lines due to studys showing that that most can not find one even though the person had a good pulse. It is recommended that a lay person look for signs of life. Breathing , movement , groaning, etc. Before attempting cpr. Also I would strongly recommend that a one not try to remove any material from a perons mouth manually. American heart states that the victim should remove the object on their own & should only be removed by a rescuer if their is a total blockage of the airway. All so I found that 98% of motorcycle accident victims suffer either a open or closed head injury and that the most important thing a lay person is get help. For the thing that can save them is a helicopter, blood & jet fuel.
 

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I use 1CE instead of ICE as it comes up on top of your cell phonebook.

Plus, you've got to make sure all the ICE recipients are cool heads who can "handle" the information.
 

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Good stuff. Just remember to stay calm and don't forget common sense. Don't be afraid of telling other people to stay back if they're doing retarded things like pulling the helmet off a guy who's got a patent airway.
 

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In attempting to help my fallen friend, Maruice, we had to make a pretty quick decision to take off his helmet. No pulse. I had learned at a BMW dealer clinic to open the bottom as wide as you can. Stretch it open.

I think, most of the time, you will find more people than you need, even in BFE. In our tragic case, we had med students, a cardiologist, a BMW riding fireman and plenty of people with water, phones and all. Had we been out there alone, it would have been "sack up time". Also, I learned you can only do 100 beats per minute using CPR for 5 or so minutes before you drop too. You need 2-3 people to sustain the process.
 
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Henry Hester said:
In attempting to help my fallen friend, Maruice, we had to make a pretty quick decision to take off his helmet. No pulse. I had learned at a BMW dealer clinic to open the bottom as wide as you can. Stretch it open.

I think, most of the time, you will find more people than you need, even in BFE. In our tragic case, we had med students, a cardiologist, a BMW riding fireman and plenty of people with water, phones and all. Had we been out there alone, it would have been "sack up time". Also, I learned you can only do 100 beats per minute using CPR for 5 or so minutes before you drop too. You need 2-3 people to sustain the process.
Doing chest compressions gets old fast. Sorry about your friend, sounds like you did all you could for him.
 

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I have read that before, excellent read! There is nothing more valuable than knowledge, especially when it comes to something as important as this! +1 for a good post! I think it definately deserves a sticky :)
 

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If you're serious about being prepared for this kind of situation, and in the UK, then it's useful to know that the St. John's Ambulance do a motorcycle specific First Aid course.

The course I did was tailored to the racing event I was marshalling at, but it covered exactly the things listed in the first post - what to do, how to do it, and getting other people to be useful.

There was far too much for me to type out here, but there were a lot of little things that can help - e.g. approaching a fallen rider from the feet so they don't turn their head to look at you. We also did proper helmet removal, and checking/opening airways while the helmet is still on.
 

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If you're serious about being prepared for this kind of situation, and in the UK, then it's useful to know that the St. John's Ambulance do a motorcycle specific First Aid course.

The course I did was tailored to the racing event I was marshalling at, but it covered exactly the things listed in the first post - what to do, how to do it, and getting other people to be useful.

There was far too much for me to type out here, but there were a lot of little things that can help - e.g. approaching a fallen rider from the feet so they don't turn their head to look at you. We also did proper helmet removal, and checking/opening airways while the helmet is still on.
It's sad but the first thing most Good Samaratins do is pull off helmets...educational courses are awesome, everyone should take one, and take your family with you.
 

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ICE problem

I am a medic in Dallas. If you are hurt so bad that you can't tell me your medical information or next of kin. I won't be wasting time looking through your cell phone trying to figure out who to call. I will be working to save your life. I have never seen or truly heard of ICE being used by emergency personnel.
 

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It is recommended in American Heart that a typical lay person not assess for pulse in the guide lines due to studys showing that that most can not find one even though the person had a good pulse. It is recommended that a lay person look for signs of life. Breathing , movement , groaning, etc. Before attempting cpr. Also I would strongly recommend that a one not try to remove any material from a perons mouth manually. American heart states that the victim should remove the object on their own & should only be removed by a rescuer if their is a total blockage of the airway. All so I found that 98% of motorcycle accident victims suffer either a open or closed head injury and that the most important thing a lay person is get help. For the thing that can save them is a helicopter, blood & jet fuel.
The removing whats in there airway sounds like bad advice, whos to know if its a total blockage or not? And if it isnt that doesnt mean it wont be when it moves. At the end of the day if you dont breath you die, so I would be hoping anyone removed what was blocking my throat straight away.
 

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