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Discussion Starter #1
Just back from Afghanistan and got a 2012 ZX10R. The irony of this whole situation is the amount of caution I tried to take while getting back on a bike after some time. I placed the bike in low power setting, hit a local parking lot and attempted to re acclimate to riding. Also went and took the Advanced riders course again to brush up a little. Once I felt I was comfortable I started daily riding again. Now I always tell people that I knew my day would come as most people will tell you "it's not if,but when your going to take one down" but not like this.

Heading into work I had just got onto the highway and as usual moved into the left lane once a passing car had cleared. Traffic was high and I was moving no more that 30mph and maintained space with car in front of me. Somethi g I'd late find out is that 5 cars ahead a vehicle cut off my lane and forced everyone to slam on they're brakes. Suddenly I see the vehicle in front of me hard swerve back to right lane and another car swerved to the left shoulder. This set me up with a stopped car in the left lane and both escape routes around it blocked. My only option at this point was to attempt to avoid the vehicles and shoot a gap to a dirt median. The end result was not being able to completely avoid the stopped car and I clipped the back corner of an SUV. I made contact with my shoulder and head and was then ejected off the bike about 10ft. I broke some ribs and destroyed my fuel tank but that is the full extent of the damage.

This being my first post I wanted to just highlight the dangers we all encounter each day and the risk we all knowingly take. Im fortunate to have suffered very little as I know In my area of 6 fellow riders who didn't make it home in the last month. I encourage senior riders to stress the use of safety gear and understanding the time and place to ride certain ways. As stated Before, I took every precaution I could think of, I wasn't speeding or driving like an maniac and still ended up in a situation that I had little to no control over. I love the rider community and it's up to us to share stories and knowledge to keep each other safe.This forum is outstanding, If any one else has a story they could share that be super awesome. Ride safe 馃


P.S: If anyone knows of a 2012 fuel tank that's for grabs lmk hahaha
 

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First off I鈥檓 glad you are ok, banged up a bit but sounds like you are going to be alright, thats the important thing, bikes can be fixed. Sometimes things happen out there that are beyond our control, sounds like you got caught up in one of those situations. I once got t-boned by another rider. I came up on a stop sign and made a left turn, apparently this guy didnt know there was a stop sign and he came in super hot, he locked up his rear and slammed in to me just as I made the left. Messed me up pretty good, I actually stopped riding for a while after that one, but we always come back! Glad you are ok brother!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's rough man and thanks! Glad to hear you got back to riding. I'm hoping nothing feels to different when I try to get back on although I'm sure no one gets back on the same as before a crash. Safe riding brother!
 

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Riding is dangerous for sure. I always use this thought to direct my actions on what gear to wear.....imagine yourself sliding down the road after being ejected from the bike ( at whatever speed). Put that gear on guys!!!! No exceptions. Glad to hear you made it without major consequences.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Guarf I appreciate it boss and scout, that was literally what I said once I could breath again haha. I hit the ground and did the choking fish noise for a bit then when I could actually talk I looked at the guy standing over me and said "well crap". He looked at my bike and the back at me and he replied "yeah.......shitty eh?"
 

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any crash you walk away from (AKA survive) was a good one

happens to even the best... you did what you could, but sometimes its unavoidable
 

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Well I get to be that guy again but this was your own fault and you could have had full control of the situation but you did not. You are correct you weren't riding crazy, you just weren't riding safe and didn't know it and that's fine, it's not an insult. I am going to try to be educational, this is for everyone, and not just you.

One, brakes, if you couldn't stop from your speed to not rear end someone in front of you, you were following too closely to the traffic ahead of you. The gap you maintained was in fact not safe, add more space next time. And/or/also, you need practice on your brakes and learning threshold braking on your bike, good to practice in parking lots.

Two, eyes, if you weren't looking past the brake lights of the guy in front of you, you weren't looking down the road enough. You would be able to see the people ahead of the car you were following slam on their brakes and slow pre-emptively. You should be seeing at least 3-4 cars ahead of you, the next bend or curve in the road, but always ahead of you so that you can respond to any change in situation instead of reacting to something right in front of you, which is immensely more difficult. When you say "suddenly" the car in front of you does something, that tells me you weren't looking down range, it's a very common issue among all vehicle operators especially commuting.

Two point five. Eyes, make sure you look where you're wanting to go, and not "target fixating". When you hit the back of the vehicle, were you looking at that rear bumper, or looking at the gap you were trying to hit? Not saying you did it right or wrong but many times people have oh shit moments, it's cuz they were looking in the wrong place at the wrong time. It's why cop cars pulled over on the side of the road with their lights on get hit by people. People look at it, and then drive toward it unintentionally. Same thing with bikes.


Three, you didn't mention it but I'll mention it, bike placement, never ride in the middle of the lane behind a car, always be behind a brake light on the edge, preferably driver side, so you can see the driver in their mirror, so you can judge what they're doing next as they turn their head side to side to change lanes or whatnot. Also, more importantly, you don't have to swerve as far to get around a car when you're already on the sides and you can split between cars easier this way. This also allows you to see down the middle of the lanes allowing you to see further ahead which wraps back up to point number 2.

Lessons learned, glad you aren't hurt too bad, ribs are uncomfortable for 3 weeks but manageable and a fuel tank can be easily replaced. Leave more following distance, keep eyes up, make sure your bike placement is proper. Many of these things, are all learned at the track doing track days. I'd highly recommend finding a local track day organization that has a school and taking it.

I'm not being a dick here but pointing out that there's an attitude among riders young and old that accidents just happen but the majority of the time, it's rider error that starts between the ears, and usually it's not intentional, it's lack of training and awareness. The worst thing you can do is walk away from this and not learn anything or change how you ride.

This is painful acting, but worth watching, and if you've watched it before, watch it again, I do every year or so
 

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Unfortunately it's just part of the game. Many times, like this one, it won't even be our fault. Be glad you sustained pretty minor damage, and the same for your bike. Now, recover, repair, and ride. In that order. Check offerup or craigslist for local parts, or ebay if it gets too bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
No hard feelings, I'm open to any and all criticism and don't want it to seem like I didn't take anything away. Always learning even if its the hard way and this will definitely change how I navigate the roads. I take alot of courses (Army mandates it) but mainly have been MSF hosted. Never been involved with anything track but definitely gonna try to get my foot in and start learning from that aspect of riding. My wife is looking at getting involved with a female group here that runs the track so might be the next move in the community for us.
 

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Yes, Code's Twist II is a great FOUNDATION structured learning book. Never watched any of Code's vids, but sure that they are good. Have to read it a ton and apply techniques.

Here's where Twist gets more abstract: there are learning layers above Code's fundamental skill points. Code calls this perception, 'taken to the next level.'

Why I so love riding the only real bikes made: super bikes; liter bikes as it's only these bikes that respond to the rider's skill levels.
 

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No hard feelings, I'm open to any and all criticism and don't want it to seem like I didn't take anything away. Always learning even if its the hard way and this will definitely change how I navigate the roads. I take alot of courses (Army mandates it) but mainly have been MSF hosted. Never been involved with anything track but definitely gonna try to get my foot in and start learning from that aspect of riding. My wife is looking at getting involved with a female group here that runs the track so might be the next move in the community for us.
Track not needed and is a waste of time and that makes it a waste of money; very tricky for two in the family in this sport. If both are serious. I'm just thinking of money cost, which for me is freakin tires.

What I do is develop a couple loops between 150-200 miles; I'll ride a loop everyday weather permitting. I LEARN the loop. The loop has commute traffic and rural. Take the loop slowly at first FOR WEEKS then the comfort zone takes over especially as you apply Twist concepts. Remember, LEARN the loop; if loop unknown we tighten up and the bike wants us off; have to get beyond that tighten-fear whatever and into the comfort zone. So much more but this is enough.

Have to be in shape so I jog and do a bunch of pushups and situps and cheat like crazy but it works.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
For sure will take that and look at implementing it as well. Again I try to be like a sponge with riding. I'm not brand new by any means but I'm far from considering myself veteran rider. But on a very bright side I did all repairs on my bike and she runs beautifully thanks to countless hours digging for info through old threads on this forum which also educated me on the bike. Today I got back on for 30 min ride around the area...fun fact is rib's are still tender haha.
 
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