Gasket and Cam Install - Kawasaki ZX-10R.net
 
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post #1 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 11:13 AM Thread Starter
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Gasket and Cam Install

Okay this is my itteration of the gasket and cam install.
To make everyones life easier please post questions in this thread so we all can learn from each other...I dont have the internet at home so responding to 10 PM's a day will be impossible.

First I'd like to thank "my personal religious figure" for helping me when I f'ed stuff up...you DA MAN

And thanks to Ivan for his phone support and Dale Walker as well...these guys know their stuff and Ivan helps support this forum...HE ROCKS

I will be adding links to pictures as I'm able to upload them to my personal webspace but I do not plan on changing any link names and they will be up for some time (I have 2GB of storage so I'm not worried about 25 pictures)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Head Gasket Change and Cam Degreeing


Tools Required
  • Screwdrivers (1-2 flat heads with different size heads & #1 & #2 phillips head)
  • Allen sockets or T-handles 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 that I can remember maybe 10
  • Impact wrench for front sprocket removal
  • Sockets all in mm for ¼” and 3/8” drive: 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 17, 27, 32 (I prefer 32 for the CS sprocket nut)
  • Degree wheel
  • Piston stop device
  • Dial indicator with magnetic base stand
  • Stock tool kit (plug removal tool works great considering)
  • Robo-grips with the rubber covering (covers are 12 for $2 at SEARS)
  • 3” & 6” 3/8” extensions
  • lock-tite medium hold
  • pointer mechanism ( I used a plain old metal hanger cut and bent to size)
  • spacers and washers to move the degree wheel away from the engine
Engine Removal

In order to complete this you must remove the engine from the frame: I have created a how-to below with the appropriate pages outlined in the service manual.
  • Drain the following fluids: Engine Oil (2-52) & Engine Coolant (2-54) Coolant Reserve tank (87 in lbs torque)
  • Remove the following pieces from the motorcycle:
· Side triangles, bottom fairing, side panels, passenger’s seat, between seat plate, & driver’s seat. (Chapter 15 Frame)

· Throttle Body Assembly (3-108)

· Clutch Cable Lower End (6-6)

· Radiator (4-11) this requires removal of upper fairing

· Exhaust pipe assembly (5-29—5-31)

· Shift lever

· Drive sprocket and rear wheel

· Camshaft position sensor connector (16-43—16-44)
  • After all of the following have been performed begin the instructions on page 8-5 of the service manual. This will complete the engine removal process. Please use Zip-loc baggies to keep bolts organized so you know where the pieces go and also use tape to coordinate where cables and plugs go….a sharpie and duct tape make your life a ton easier.
To begin the process I removed the side fairings and the lower fairing in order to drain the oil. While the oil drains you can begin removing the muffler, rider seat, side triangles, and gas tank. Once oil has drained replace the drain plug. I did not change my oil filter as I only had 300mi on it. With everything else removed you need to remove the airbox and air snorkels, then the upper fairing. During upper fairing removal you do not need to unplug the gauge cluster or the big white connector only two gray connectors…these connectors are held on a bracket that attaches to the upper via a 4mm allen head bolt, remove the bracket and it will make your life easier.

Now it is time to drain the radiator, follow the procedures in the manual and remember to drain the head of coolant as well as the water pump. While this drains you can begin to remove the clutch cable and throttle cables from the housing on the right clip-on. This will keep your throttle cables adjusted during reinstall and no more adjustments will need to be made. Replace all bolts (water pump (104 in lbs) & Head drain (87 in lbs)) then remove and drain the coolant overflow bottle (bottle bolts (87 in lbs of torque). *Now remove the radiator and set it down so that it can’t be damaged. *There is a clamp that holds some wiring with a white pin in the clamp, I found it easier to remove the bracket because these push pin connectors don’t like going in reverse! This is at the top left of the radiator

Next you will remove the headers from the manifold it is helpful but not required to remove the bottom radiator bracket (10mm hex head). Also make sure the exhaust cables are removed if they have not been already.

(NOTE: I have removed the KLEEN/AIS from my bike) At this time you will see a junction box near the regulator, remove the ground wire by pull up on this and pinching the sides. This exposes a 30-amp fuse pull this fuse to ensure there is no power to the bike. Next there will be two positive leads on the same box remove the most forward one as this goes to the alternator when you are removing the engine (book doesn’t tell you about this one…fuggers). You should have a bare engine with the exception of the throttle bodies. Loosen the 5mm Allen heads through the frame and pull up on the throttle bodies to unseat them (104 in lbs of torque). Now you will need to remove the 4 connectors outlined in the service manual (1 green under left side fuel rail, 1 attached to engine on left side near starter motor, 1-2 for the power commander connections, 1 bottom right that isn’t visible unless the throttle bodies are removed…this goes back to the cam sensor on the front of the head near radiator. Throttle bodies should be placed in a trash bag to keep them clean and tied shut.

"Bikes are like women: beat them like a whore, they can take it and you will like the moaning you hear."

Last edited by BNninja; 03-23-2005 at 11:17 AM.
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post #2 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
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Now you truly have a bare engine in a frame. Stuff some old white t-shirt into the intake to make sure nothing drops inside, you want low lint devices. There are a few more connectors that need to be removed before you can “drop” the engine. There is a gray one that is attached to a bracket on the head cover and another connector on the rear of the head cover remove the brackets is easiest to do and then split the connectors. You can now remove the coil wires, remember the gray connector is on the left so you will know how to assemble the wiring in order. The connectors I said to remove are all in chapter 8 with the exception of 3-4 which are all pictured on page 17-20 of the service manual, There is three of them which need to be labeled ensuring proper reassembly…the fourth should have been the positive lead you already removed from the junction box (this has a tiny lock washer that will fall and get lost be careful)

Lastly, we need to remove the output sprocket which is made easier by the removal of the rear wheel and the shift lever from the splined shaft. *Remember to use a zip tie for the front brake lever so the bike doesn’t fall over. (sprocket nut 93 fl lbs and apply lock-tite to the thread and flatten washer --- rear axle nut is 83 ft lbs)

Okay with everything looking clean in the engine you should being removing the head and head cover. This can not be done without removing the stick coils. To remove the stick coils you need to remove the engine brackets on the sides of the engine…not only the three bolts but the three bolts that hold the brackets (run parallel to the frame). The top three bolts are 18ft lbs of torque and the real engine bolts are 33 ft lbs of torque. Now you can pull the stick coils out so the head cover can be removed. Remove the 6 bolts that hold on the head cover and you can now see the cams exposed.

To remove the head you must remove the cam guides and the cam chain. To do this remove the cam chain tensioner and the top and bottom cam guide bolts (top 18ft lbs bottom 104ft lbs). Slide the cam guide out of the top of the head. This should give you enough room to remove the cam chain from the cam sprockets. Remove the cams with the sprockets still attached. I did not remove the spark plugs at this point or the plug hole gaskets, it is NOT necessary. Now remove the head bolts. Have someone stabilize the bike because these buggers are in there tight (42ft lbs for used 44 ft lbs for new bolts). Now you can remove the head and allow the chain to slide through the body of the head.

Clean the head surface and block surface and all gasket surfaces that have been removed so that new gaskets can be installed in their place. I found fuel injection/carburetor cleaner in a aerosol can to work the best for this and since it is in the cylinder it will combust like gasoline and work very well. This is a very involved job and for $61 you can replace all the gaskets; do it right the first time!* DO NOT HAND TURN CRANK IF THE CHAIN IS NOT HELD TAUGHT YOU WILL KINK THE CHAIN LEADING TO FURTHER FUTURE REPAIRS.

*The book states to remove the timing rotor, crankshaft sprocket, crankshaft position sensor but this is not necessary at this time and will be done before the cams are degreed. By all means follow the book if you want because these items will need to be removed at some time…I just think this is a waste of steps at the current moment

Many people do not want to drop the engine but if you look the engine is now being held by only two bolts! Drop the engine it isn’t that hard. Remove the nuts on the left side of the bike (14mm I believe)(one is hidden behind the engine drive chain so you need a 6” 3/8” extension. Now you need to turn the allen head bolts on the right side clockwise to thread the engine adjusters into the frame and the entire engine to pivot and be removed. Before sliding the two bolts out secure the engine with a 2x6 under the engine and have a friend hold the engine as it will shift during removal.

Chapter 5 and 8 should outline everything that has been removed thus far and possibly chapter 3 for throttle body removal if my notes don’t suffice. Torque specs for all nuts are given in the manual along with the parts diagram at the beginning of each chapter.

Head Gasket Change

Remove these pieces that have not already been removed: (5-19)
· Cylinder Head Cover (5-11) this requires the removal of a bracket pictured in manual, stick coils (16-40) make sure to note coils and wires 1-4 from left to right, & air suction valve covers (87 in lb or torque).

· Position crankshaft in TDC before proceeding take initial cam degree readings with stock alignment marks

· Camshaft position sensor from head (16-43—16-44)

· Camshafts (5-14): includes camshaft chain tensioner (5-13), front camshafts chain guide, front camshaft chain guide (upper & lower bolt)*, camshaft caps, lastly cam sprocket mounting bolts and cam sprockets

· Cam chain (5-17): requires the removal of timing rotor* (16-39) & crankshaft sensor (16-37)—This may not have to be done…it’s not in the manual

· Remove the head mounting bolts and you are done start with the 6mm ones then the 8mm ones…time to reassemble* **

*You must turn the crank 4x to equal two complete engine revolutions, this will ensure proper cam chain tension has been recalibrated.

** Use the stock timing marks and note the position of the camshaft and crankshaft. Now remove the camshaft sprocket bolts and turn the sprocket to the adjustable portion of the cam sprocket…this will hopefully have kept you very close to stock settings and may have not disturbed your TDC positioning from the head gasket removal.


Cam Degreeing


1. Use the instructions from webpages that you have printed to find TDC…and set your degree wheel to reflect TDC as the point equally between BTDC and ATDC and set pointer to show 0 degrees. (see page 7-4 for information on turning the crank from left side of bike)

Remember to take readings from the valve retainer and check for .040” of movement….DO NOT ALLOW CRANKSHAFT TO TURN IN REVERSE or you will need to redo the whole reading
Use the equations of (BTDC + ATDC + 180)/2 = X – (smallest number BTDC or ATDC)
To adjust the settings: you must turn the crankshaft while the cam sprocket nuts are loose so the crankshaft can move independently of the cams….and recheck your settings.
· Remove the Timing Rotor as part of attaching the degree wheel to find the true TDC. Then follow the above steps over and over until you reach your desired settings (Intake=106-107; Exhaust=104 with .040” of lift)

Now is the time to remove the spark plugs!

Mount the degree wheel onto the timing rotor side if you elect not to drill and tap the crankshaft bolt (After seeing Dale Walker’s video I would drill and tap this bolt to ¼” hole). The measurements will be taken from cylinder 1 because it is easily accessible without interfering with the cam journals or lobes. From left of the bike (14mm) crankshaft nut turn it clockwise to move the pistons down into the engine about 80 degrees (remember the 1 & 4 should have been at TDC during removal of the timing rotor). This moves the piston down into the cylinder and then we will insert our piston stop device into the spark plug hole. Now we will mount our pointer to show us the degree the wheel reads. Since I did mine on the right side of the bike I mounted my pointer using an 8mm hex nut placed into the hole where there was once a bracket that held the middle fairing (above the clutch cable holder can’t miss it). Now we will be turning the engine counter clockwise until the piston contacts the stop…record the number on the degree wheel. Then move the crankshaft in a clockwise motion until the piston again contacts the piston stop. Record this number down and plug it into the equation: 1st + 2nd = xx/2 -- Move your pointer to the indicated number of this equation (I believe this is to the right to close up the centers). This move should have the value at a point equally in between each of these numbers. Now again turn the engine counter clockwise to ensure the number from the equation is the number your pointer stops at. Turn it again clockwise and make sure you are still getting the same number…if it is you have found TDC. Turn the engine counter clockwise so the pointer stops at the 0 TDC point of the degree wheel. This is middle of the other two numbers and is TDC. You will get it once you have played with it enough.

Now you can mount the 14 gauge steel plate that will allow the mounting of the pointing device and base. You will need to mount the pointer with a ½” extension so that it is long enough to contact the valve tappet. Before setting the height remember to have the indicator pointing as close to parallel to the valve angle as possible and the mount running close to the lobe as possible so everything is a direct mimic of how the cams work. Turn crankshaft counter clockwise until the top of the lobe is moving the valve. Now push the indicator down so that 1/8” is above the dial adjuster and zero out the dial. You want to make sure you are catching all movement. And that the device doesn’t stop when you come to the top of the lobe which is why we made sure we are contacting the tappet with the lobe on it. From here we will only turn the engine from in the direction of counter clockwise never in reverse. We are measuring for .004” of lift (the very first .004) and after the lobe goes over we are measuring the very LAST .004 before we hut zero…you can see when the lobe is about to be flat and guess the time to get .004 measurement.

"Bikes are like women: beat them like a whore, they can take it and you will like the moaning you hear."

Last edited by BNninja; 03-23-2005 at 11:16 AM.
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post #3 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 11:14 AM Thread Starter
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To advance the intake cam loosen one bolt and turn the crankshaft counter clockwise from left side of bike. Ensure you see the sprocket and chain moving and also see the bolt hole getting smaller on the left side. Retake measurements until you have the desired lobe center.

Exhaust is the opposite, is what Dale Walker says and I honestly can’t remember off the top of my head. Turn it one way…if it is wrong turn it the other way.

"Bikes are like women: beat them like a whore, they can take it and you will like the moaning you hear."
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post #4 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 11:18 AM Thread Starter
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post #5 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 11:53 AM
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...link not a link,,,

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post #6 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
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I know, I'm too lazy to find the correct url

"Bikes are like women: beat them like a whore, they can take it and you will like the moaning you hear."
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post #7 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 01:31 PM
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Very Nice...well Done Bn

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post #8 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 01:43 PM
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Great write-up. One minor suggestion, if you are going to do the head gasket and cam degreeing, it might be easier to remove the entire engine and then remove the head, rather than remove the head while it is in the bike. Not sure, I haven't done it on this bike, but that's how it is on other bikes. It's a lot easier to tinker with an engine when it's on a workbench than when it's installed in a vehicle.


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post #9 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 01:48 PM Thread Starter
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We thought of that but as I said the bolts are a MOFO and the chances of the engine falling over when out of the bike are greater than with it in the bike. I also thought the head weight might make the engine want to fall forward on the stand, but after reassembly I realized that was a wrong assumption. Dont know how I would do it if I were to do it again though

"Bikes are like women: beat them like a whore, they can take it and you will like the moaning you hear."
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post #10 of 43 Old 03-23-2005, 02:29 PM
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But Your Glad You Don't Have To Do It Again..

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