Thought I'd give an update. - Page 2 - Kawasaki ZX-10R.net
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #11 of 17 Old 01-28-2004, 10:33 PM
I really need to get out of the house
 
Andy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Fo Wo TEXAS
Posts: 11,176
Posting Frequency
Images: 25
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by big b
andy I sent you a description of the clean air system to your box. It was straight from a kawasaki bulletin :D :D
Thanks b
Andy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 17 Old 01-29-2004, 04:34 AM
Champion Rider
 
Ninja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 265
Posting Frequency
 
Kawasaki Air Injection System
On most models takes the air for injection into the exhaust ports from the air cleaner housing.

The air injection system is controlled by a vacuum operated air control valve.

In most models it is controlled by vacuum, however in some new 2004 models this is now ECU controlled. See VN2000

The vacuum used to control the system is taken from the intake port of one cylinder. The vacuum pulls a sealed diaphragm against a spring to open the valve and let the air through the valve. The spring returns the valve to the closed position when the throttle is open.

As the vacuum system is sealed it does not change the mixture in the cylinder, which supplies the vacuum. It only opens under relative high vacuum i.e. throttle closed.

To prevent the chance of an exhaust backfire reaching the air box, one-way reed valves are installed in the cylinder head cover.

The system works by reducing unburnt hydrocarbons being emitted out the exhaust by injecting fresh air to completely burn any unburnt gasses under closed throttles.

It is not a new feature and has been used by Kawasaki for many years.

Kawasaki models vent the crankcase into the air cleaner housing to recycle any blow by from the crankcase back through the intake system.

Most models have only one crankcase vent. ZX636B 03 model last time I looked had only one crankcase vent, top crankcase at the rear.

The reed valves are connected to the exhaust port by a sealed tube. Sealed to prevent the oil contaminating the system of by having exhaust gases leak into the crankcases.

Possible performance issues with the KAIS.

Air leaks passed the diaphragm or leaking vacuum through an small hole in the vacuum line will upset the mixture in the cylinder operating the system.

Valve fails to open results in higher emissions.
Valve opens and fails to close the air injection is open and will circulate fresh air passed the reed valves into the exhaust.

CA models have additional tubes for the gas canister. Last time I looked 4 color-coded tubes connect to the canister. These control the flow of fuel tank gasoline vapour and any other gasoline vapour emissions back to the canister and recycle the condensed gasoline back to the intake side of the engine.

Down sides of this system, weight, many tubes and easy to connect wrong.

This not to say problems are not possible, in my experience it would be extremely rare considering the amount of Kawasaki sold with this exact same system.
Ninja is offline  
post #13 of 17 Old 01-29-2004, 11:59 AM Thread Starter
Champion Rider
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 250
Posting Frequency
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninja
Kawasaki Air Injection System
On most models takes the air for injection into the exhaust ports from the air cleaner housing.

The air injection system is controlled by a vacuum operated air control valve.

In most models it is controlled by vacuum, however in some new 2004 models this is now ECU controlled. See VN2000

The vacuum used to control the system is taken from the intake port of one cylinder. The vacuum pulls a sealed diaphragm against a spring to open the valve and let the air through the valve. The spring returns the valve to the closed position when the throttle is open.

As the vacuum system is sealed it does not change the mixture in the cylinder, which supplies the vacuum. It only opens under relative high vacuum i.e. throttle closed.

To prevent the chance of an exhaust backfire reaching the air box, one-way reed valves are installed in the cylinder head cover.

The system works by reducing unburnt hydrocarbons being emitted out the exhaust by injecting fresh air to completely burn any unburnt gasses under closed throttles.

It is not a new feature and has been used by Kawasaki for many years.

Kawasaki models vent the crankcase into the air cleaner housing to recycle any blow by from the crankcase back through the intake system.

Most models have only one crankcase vent. ZX636B 03 model last time I looked had only one crankcase vent, top crankcase at the rear.

The reed valves are connected to the exhaust port by a sealed tube. Sealed to prevent the oil contaminating the system of by having exhaust gases leak into the crankcases.

Possible performance issues with the KAIS.

Air leaks passed the diaphragm or leaking vacuum through an small hole in the vacuum line will upset the mixture in the cylinder operating the system.

Valve fails to open results in higher emissions.
Valve opens and fails to close the air injection is open and will circulate fresh air passed the reed valves into the exhaust.

CA models have additional tubes for the gas canister. Last time I looked 4 color-coded tubes connect to the canister. These control the flow of fuel tank gasoline vapour and any other gasoline vapour emissions back to the canister and recycle the condensed gasoline back to the intake side of the engine.

Down sides of this system, weight, many tubes and easy to connect wrong.

This not to say problems are not possible, in my experience it would be extremely rare considering the amount of Kawasaki sold with this exact same system.
All your fuctions of the Kleen system are 100 percent correct. But you are probably aware of Newtons law of pressure. The longer a distance air travels within a closed system, the less pressure and force it has as itís expanded. This is especially true with Kawasakiís kleen system.

The new 2004 Kleen system is a question mark as of right now to me. I donít know if it follows the same setup guidelines as the 2003 which was vacuum controlled, but Iíd be surprised it if was exactly the same. Especially after all the people whom were complaining about the system since it was first put on the bike in the first place.

By running the crankcase directly to the exhaust air value you are creating a tighter area were less air needs to travel in order to go the same distance. Not to mention there is always flex in tubing, etc because it is made of rubber.

Things which cause to much pressure loss include but are not limited to: Fuel return pump and the exhaust air switching value (The biggest force in horsepower loss using this system)

However the biggest factor in increasing the pressure and helping the accelerator is capping off the three vacuum ports/throttle bodied . This has the biggest impact on how fast your bikeís throttle response will be.

You donít have to take my word for it. But Iíve done this to not only my bike, but my brothers bike. And it has made a huge difference for both of us. Iíve also researched this topic so many times my eyes are starting to bleed. The most common response people say is ďI feel like the bike revís faster, or the throttle is quickerĒ. Hence the reason for doing this conversion in the first place. Some of the people who are far knowledgeable than I on www.kawiforums.com have reported doing this system and having great results. Donít take my word for it, but you should check out there opinions and maybe take some of thereís.

Maybe this new system will be better since itís computer controlled now. If it isnít you can bet I the first thing I do is remove this crap.
CDRacingZX6R is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #14 of 17 Old 01-29-2004, 03:34 PM
Squid
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: NZ
Posts: 2
Posting Frequency
 
another downside is that you're processing all that crap back through the top-end yukk!
kiwi7y is offline  
post #15 of 17 Old 01-30-2004, 05:32 AM
Champion Rider
 
Ninja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 265
Posting Frequency
 
The ZX10R retains the vacuum operated air valve; I said some (one) 2004 models have the new electric air valve see the VN2000.

The VN2000 has each piston with a cylinder capacity larger than a ZX10R.

These big pistons had Kawasaki looking for greater control over the air valve and they opted for the ECU controlled system.

It is not an admission by Kawasaki that one system works better than the other.

It is the use of a new system is for one very large engine, with unique requirements. The VN2000 also meets all the emission standards world-wide without impacting on the performance of the engine, 110 PS and enough torque to battle lots of sports bikes with its sheer grunt from a long stroke V-Twin engine.

I now can easily understand how some black magic/voodoo features on bikes get a bad wrap.

The only air going through the air valve is from the air box. The emissions from the crankcase vent into the air box is relative free of crap, unless the piston or rings are leaking blow-by and require replacing.

The air injection is into the exhaust port after the exhaust valve it does not travel back into the engine, it has no effect on the combustion process in the cylinder. It has no effect on the top end wear.

Internal air box pressure increases with speed and because the crankcase is vented into the air box the engine crankcase under certain conditions may actually have above atmospheric pressure in the crankcase. Which is against all current high performance theories, Nascar, F1, RC211V etc

Will this have an impact on performance? Not at the speed range most steet engines operate.

The CA model has extra vacuum lines for the recirculation of the gas fumes. Because of the size of this canister the volume of air travelling through this system is much large than what is required to open and close the air valve.

CA models may work better with this gas fumes recirculation system disconnected (for racing purposes only).

I still do not believe the KAIS system is bad, however we are all guided by our own experience. That is not to say someone may experience some change if the KAIS is disconnected.

However when I prepare the ZX10R for racing the first modification is the removal of the air valve. Why? because the value of the air injection systems reed valves should not be ignored and their ability to provide a relative energy free source of vacuum for other benefits such as crankcase negative pressure can and should not be ignored.

Would I remove the KAIS on my Ninja ZX10R for street riding? the answer is no. Do I have any reason to expect my 49 state model would require modification for street riding? again no.

Kleen is the combination of the KAIS and the honeycomb catalyser in the muffler or tail pipe. It is a standard feature on 49 state and the European models. It is also used on the CA model with the addition of gas tank fumes recirculation.

Next subject?
Ninja is offline  
post #16 of 17 Old 01-30-2004, 02:50 PM Thread Starter
Champion Rider
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 250
Posting Frequency
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninja
The ZX10R retains the vacuum operated air valve; I said some (one) 2004 models have the new electric air valve see the VN2000.

The VN2000 has each piston with a cylinder capacity larger than a ZX10R.

These big pistons had Kawasaki looking for greater control over the air valve and they opted for the ECU controlled system.

It is not an admission by Kawasaki that one system works better than the other.

It is the use of a new system is for one very large engine, with unique requirements. The VN2000 also meets all the emission standards world-wide without impacting on the performance of the engine, 110 PS and enough torque to battle lots of sports bikes with its sheer grunt from a long stroke V-Twin engine.

I now can easily understand how some black magic/voodoo features on bikes get a bad wrap.

The only air going through the air valve is from the air box. The emissions from the crankcase vent into the air box is relative free of crap, unless the piston or rings are leaking blow-by and require replacing.

The air injection is into the exhaust port after the exhaust valve it does not travel back into the engine, it has no effect on the combustion process in the cylinder. It has no effect on the top end wear.

Internal air box pressure increases with speed and because the crankcase is vented into the air box the engine crankcase under certain conditions may actually have above atmospheric pressure in the crankcase. Which is against all current high performance theories, Nascar, F1, RC211V etc

Will this have an impact on performance? Not at the speed range most steet engines operate.

The CA model has extra vacuum lines for the recirculation of the gas fumes. Because of the size of this canister the volume of air travelling through this system is much large than what is required to open and close the air valve.

CA models may work better with this gas fumes recirculation system disconnected (for racing purposes only).

I still do not believe the KAIS system is bad, however we are all guided by our own experience. That is not to say someone may experience some change if the KAIS is disconnected.

However when I prepare the ZX10R for racing the first modification is the removal of the air valve. Why? because the value of the air injection systems reed valves should not be ignored and their ability to provide a relative energy free source of vacuum for other benefits such as crankcase negative pressure can and should not be ignored.

Would I remove the KAIS on my Ninja ZX10R for street riding? the answer is no. Do I have any reason to expect my 49 state model would require modification for street riding? again no.

Kleen is the combination of the KAIS and the honeycomb catalyser in the muffler or tail pipe. It is a standard feature on 49 state and the European models. It is also used on the CA model with the addition of gas tank fumes recirculation.

Next subject?
I disagree with you. Along with many others. Not about the fuctions, but about the results. It doesnít matter though, to each his own. :D
CDRacingZX6R is offline  
post #17 of 17 Old 01-30-2004, 04:00 PM
Champion Rider
 
Ninja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 265
Posting Frequency
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CDRacingZX6R
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ninja
The ZX10R retains the vacuum operated air valve; I said some (one) 2004 models have the new electric air valve see the VN2000.

The VN2000 has each piston with a cylinder capacity larger than a ZX10R.

These big pistons had Kawasaki looking for greater control over the air valve and they opted for the ECU controlled system.

It is not an admission by Kawasaki that one system works better than the other.

It is the use of a new system is for one very large engine, with unique requirements. The VN2000 also meets all the emission standards world-wide without impacting on the performance of the engine, 110 PS and enough torque to battle lots of sports bikes with its sheer grunt from a long stroke V-Twin engine.

I now can easily understand how some black magic/voodoo features on bikes get a bad wrap.

The only air going through the air valve is from the air box. The emissions from the crankcase vent into the air box is relative free of crap, unless the piston or rings are leaking blow-by and require replacing.

The air injection is into the exhaust port after the exhaust valve it does not travel back into the engine, it has no effect on the combustion process in the cylinder. It has no effect on the top end wear.

Internal air box pressure increases with speed and because the crankcase is vented into the air box the engine crankcase under certain conditions may actually have above atmospheric pressure in the crankcase. Which is against all current high performance theories, Nascar, F1, RC211V etc

Will this have an impact on performance? Not at the speed range most steet engines operate.

The CA model has extra vacuum lines for the recirculation of the gas fumes. Because of the size of this canister the volume of air travelling through this system is much large than what is required to open and close the air valve.

CA models may work better with this gas fumes recirculation system disconnected (for racing purposes only).

I still do not believe the KAIS system is bad, however we are all guided by our own experience. That is not to say someone may experience some change if the KAIS is disconnected.

However when I prepare the ZX10R for racing the first modification is the removal of the air valve. Why? because the value of the air injection systems reed valves should not be ignored and their ability to provide a relative energy free source of vacuum for other benefits such as crankcase negative pressure can and should not be ignored.

Would I remove the KAIS on my Ninja ZX10R for street riding? the answer is no. Do I have any reason to expect my 49 state model would require modification for street riding? again no.

Kleen is the combination of the KAIS and the honeycomb catalyser in the muffler or tail pipe. It is a standard feature on 49 state and the European models. It is also used on the CA model with the addition of gas tank fumes recirculation.

Next subject?
I disagree with you. Along with many others. Not about the fuctions, but about the results. It doesnít matter though, to each his own. :D
I would have expected no less.
Ninja is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Kawasaki ZX-10R.net forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Has anybody thought of this.... FrEteGi The ZX-10R 8 05-16-2004 08:48 PM
RedElk's ZX10R Ride and Adventure review swft The ZX-10R 11 03-11-2004 01:24 PM
update!!!! direct from kawasaki - link fixxed!!! purevol Archives 13 11-05-2003 12:37 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome